Sharing is caring!

Davis High School senior Kalina Taylor interviewed Hall of Fame quarterback Warren Moon after Moon addressed a group of Aldine ISD student-athletes at Davis High School on Wednesday, Feb. 1. Moon shared information concerning his 17-year career in the NFL with the student-athletes. Moon’s appearance was sponsored by the Pro Football Hall of Fame and Extreme Sports.

Hall of Fame quarterback Warren Moon returned to the place where his NFL career started when he addressed more than 100 Aldine ISD student-athletes on Wednesday, Feb. 1.
Moon’s NFL career began in Houston in 1984 when the Houston Oilers signed him to as a free agent after playing in the Canadian Football League, where he led the Edmonton Eskimos to five straight Grey Cup championships.
Moon’s visit to Aldine was sponsored by the Pro Football Hall of Fame and Extreme Sports. The event was streamed live across the country via the Internet.
Moon played for the Oilers from 1984-93 and led them to six straight playoff appearances. After leaving Houston, Moon also played for the Minnesota Vikings, the Seattle Seahawks and Kansas City Chiefs.
During his 17-years in the NFL, he completed 3,988 passes for 49,325 yards and 291 touchdowns. If you factor in his CFL stats, Moon passed for 70,533 yards and 435 yards.
Moon was raised in Los Angeles. When he was seven-years-old, his father Harold passed away, leaving his mother to raise him and his six sisters alone. Moon said he was driven to reach the NFL so he could pay back his mother for the sacrifices she made to raise him and his sisters.
“My goal was to succeed so I could take care of my mother,” Moon said. “She’s definitely my hero.”
Moon played collegiately at the University of Washington where he led the Huskies to a victory over Michigan in the 1978 Rose Bowl.
He knew he could play quarterback in the NFL, but he was not drafted or signed as a free agent coming out of college, so he went to the CFL where he proved he could play quarterback at the professional level.
“Football has been invaluable to me,” Moon said. “I put in the work and proved I could play the position. I appreciate the Oilers for giving me the opportunity to play in the NFL and I think we did some good things for the city.”
When asked what he learned from playing football, Moon said it was all about teamwork.
“Football is the ultimate team sport,” he said. “I learned a lot about hard work and setting goals and how to deal with low times. We had some good teams when I was with the Oilers, but we just did not get the job done to get to the Super Bowl.”
Moon reminded the student-athletes that only 0.1 percent of college football players make it to the NFL, so he suggested the young people in the audience should think about setting life-long goals.
“Find what you are passion is,” Moon said. “Find out what it is you want to do and keep setting your goals high.”
Today, Moon is the color analyst for the Seattle Seahawks radio crew. While the never won the Super Bowl ring with the Oilers or the other three teams he played for, he did receive one when the Seahawks defeated Denver in Super Bowl XLVIII.
During Moon’s stellar career, he received many honors. In 1989, he was named the Walter Payton Man of the Year and in 1990 he was named the NFL MVP and the Associated Press’ Offensive Player of the Year. He was named to the Pro Bowl nine times and was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2006.
“I’m one of only 303 Hall of Famers, so that’s pretty special,” Moon said. “Long after I’m gone, my bust will still be in the Hall of Fame.”
Mike Myers, the Youth Education Manager for the Hall of Fame served as the moderator for the event. AISD student-athletes also asked questions and Moon was introduced by AISD Deputy Superintendent Dr. Archie Blanson.

Comments

comments