African American News – Black News – Colored News – Negro News http://www.aframnews.com African American News & Issues - Black News Wed, 16 Aug 2017 19:15:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.5 Success is One of the Major Causes of Failure! http://www.aframnews.com/success-is-one-of-the-major-causes-of-failure/ http://www.aframnews.com/success-is-one-of-the-major-causes-of-failure/#respond Mon, 14 Aug 2017 19:57:57 +0000 http://www.aframnews.com/?p=19280  

By: Roy Douglas Malonson, Publisher of African-American News & Issues & Author of column series We MUST Understand

We MUST Understand that there is nothing wrong with success. There is nothing wrong with reaching for the stars to attain a level of comfort and satisfaction. But, as with all things there has to be certain limits and values that a person keeps and upholds in order to reach a level of effective success. For some people, success can be one of the most valuable assets that a person can have. While on the contrary, it can serve as a detonator when placed in the wrong hands.

 

 

 

I often say that, ‘success without a successor is failure’. But I have learned that there are more failures to the term, “success”. For, in my lifetime, I have seen on numerous occasions how success has become one of the major causes of failure, for certain people. There are people that get a little something and it seems as if it changes them forever. They are no longer the same person they once were and they arrive to a point where they outgrow the very people that helped them get to where they are. It’s like they get big-headed when they get a little something, and don’t know how to act. It reminds me of the old saying, “Be careful how you treat folk on your way up, because you just may see those same folk on your way back down!”

Over the years, I have been called some of everything under the sun. Some of it may be true, while the vast majority isn’t. However, nothing that people say about me bothers me because I know who I am, and I know the price I have had to pay to get to where I am in life. I don’t take for granted where I come from, by no means. No matter how successful other folks may think my wife and I are, there is one thing about us that will not change. That factor is the element that we don’t change. We remain true to who we are, period. To this day, neither one of us has ever forgotten where we come from.

I will even use myself as an example. It has happened so many times that I can’t count at this point.  People that have never met me before will come to my office looking for me. Prior to meeting me, they already have a preconceived notion about who I am and what I represent; based off of what they have heard or been told, probably by some other folk that don’t know me either. So when I walk up to greet them and ask, “May I help you with something?” With their opinion already formulated of who I am they will respond, “No, I’m here to see… Mr. Malonson!” Not knowing the whole time that, they are already talking to the person they are looking for. Sure, I have my overalls on and I’m just the basic everyday regular person you run into; but that’s just my point. It’s the perception that they already have about me. My clothes, status or resources does not define my character and it does not constitute who I am. There is nothing wrong with having a little something in life, but it just shouldn’t change who you are.

I hope that I am getting through to our audience because what I am conveying is a very valid point and one that is prevalent amongst members of our community. I use the term Mis-educated a lot in referring to certain folk from our communities, because people get to a point where they feel like they have arrived and they say, “the hell with everybody else”. That’s just not a good way to be, because one day it will all catch back up with you. So once again, please understand that success is one of the major causes of failure, especially when in the wrong hands.

Throughout the years, my wife and I have helped many people. Personally, I have empowered folk and then they get bigger than me. Then it places me in a dilemma to where I have to make one of the hardest decisions in the world. Do I fight the people that I fought for? Of course, it shouldn’t be that way but that is the way that it is. It’s just like our president. This man has made it all the way to being the most powerful man in the world and he is self-destructing on the platform that the American people have helped him to secure. It’s almost as if he is totally oblivious to the same people that elected him into office, can impeach his ass out. But that’s just what I mean, “Success can be one of the major causes of failure!”

                  Concluding, I would just like to reiterate that there is not a thing in the world wrong with attempting to better yourself or asking seeking help to reach success. But, when you get to a place of success, don’t let it change you and don’t forget about the people that helped you to get there.

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LIFE AFTER FOOTBALL: Former Players Turned Business & Education Leaders Say “The Real Buck Starts Here” http://www.aframnews.com/life-after-football-former-players-turned-business-education-leaders-say-the-real-buck-starts-here/ http://www.aframnews.com/life-after-football-former-players-turned-business-education-leaders-say-the-real-buck-starts-here/#respond Mon, 14 Aug 2017 16:31:22 +0000 http://www.aframnews.com/?p=19277

“One day you’re a football player…and the next day you’re not.”

Former NFL Player Chad Brown

CONROE- Football players face a difficult and harsh reality when their playing days stop.

Some of those harsh realities include dealing with possible lifelong health ailments and how to adjust to  new financial realities and challenges.

With 75-percent of the National Football League made up of African-American football players and a number of others playing in the National Basketball Association (NBA) and Major League Baseball (MLB), the time is now to teach young Black men and women counting on sports about the fallacy and false security of that kind of thinking, especially among youth playing at amateur levels that sports is the go to and end all to financial success.

The average salary for NFL players this past season was about $2 million. According to the NFL Players Association, the average length of a player’s career is 3 1/2 years.

 

BUILDING BLOCKS TO GREATNESS

There is a need to help young people at early stages understand that sports talent is only one of the building blocks of greatness.

That’s why a cooperative effort is underway in Conroe and the Woodlands area to reach youth and teach the value of education.

Using their successes in business and community endeavors after football careers, Gerald D. Irons, son Grants Irons and Jackie Battle have partnered with Ellis Wyms and the Wyms Foundation and Professional Athletes Celebrities and Entertainers Mothers Organization (PACE) to do the On and Off Program for youth.

The Wyms Foundation creates programs that focus on Fitness, S.T.E.M. and Personal Intervention through E-Colors in Education. The programs and events are designed to improve middle school age youth in 3 areas: S.T.E.M, Fitness and Personality Diversity with the goal to provide computer devices and online programming to schools and community centers that have summer enrichment and after school programs. The programming will immerse students into Science, Computer Science, Engineering, Fitness Gaming and Personality Diversity.

There are opportunities in this economy but you have to be specific about skills to be able to compete on a global level,” Wyms said. “We put together groups to give back to community and use our resources and networks to bring in kids and partners to get kids access to the kind of skills they need.”

According to Wyms, As a nation we have gotten behind and that is why we have to import a skilled labor force from abroad.

It has nothing to do with skin color, it is all about work ethic,” he said. “How I think how I process information and how I study. You have to empower kids with confidence that they are smart and empower them to think that they are just as intelligent as others in the room.

To help African-American youth to get competitive, Wyms noted that at some point in history – if you get skills and there is a need no one can hold you back.

We are at a point here all are at the same starting line and the only difference is the skill set you acquire,”he said. “You can bypass the traditional things that have held minorities back if you have that skill set you have  you are valuable – it is the kind that a company needs or that will give you the power and what you need to start your own company.

 

KEY TO SPORTS TRANSITION FOCUS

While not downplaying the value of sports in education, the group hopes to shift the focus from dependence of sports to a reliance on education.

Most players likely will not be paid close to that kind of salary in their post-playing career. Former players report that adjusting to their new financial reality is challenging.

The violence of the game also takes its toll on their bodies, and the abrupt end can lead to financial and emotional struggles for which they are not prepared.

In a 2013 survey of 763 former NFL players conducted by Newsday in conjunction with the NFL Players Association’s former players division showed 61 percent said they found it difficult to adjust to daily life after their career, while 85 percent said they did not believe the NFL adequately prepared them for the transition.

Players that play in league now have a responsibility to make sure they encourage African American students to not just focus on football, but focus on life after football,” said Gerald Irons said on post NFL life. “This is what Myrna and I stressed to our three sons.  Don’t just focus on sport, the field or basketball court alone. You have to focus on education and what is in your mind.”

He said he and his wife of four-plus decades encouraged them to study hard, work hard in school and all three got full scholarships to play at any school they wanted.

“…We wanted them to focus on more than just football. Education and good behavior was the focus -We knew and wanted them to know and understand that what was most important was life after football.”

His wife Myrna echoed that importance stating that the Irons wanted all of their African-American sons to feel good about themselves and know they are worthy.

We did not allow anyone to tell them they were not good enough,” she said. “We Led by example – no smoking or drinking and taught sons how to treat a lady. We treated each other like a king and queen and that served as examples for our sons because we wanted to be the number one role model, so that they could know how to treat their future wives and teach their sons and daughters.”

 

LIFE AFTER FOOTBALL HEALTH

For Grant Irons, health concerns played a key role in helping him prepare for life after the game.

Most “football collisions” are as violent or more violent than car crashes and that takes a major toll on the body, especially the head and brain.

According to the Mayo Clinic, Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) is the term used to describe brain degeneration likely caused by repeated head traumas. CTE is a diagnosis only made at autopsy by studying sections of the brain.

CTE is a very rare condition. It has been found in the brains of people who played contact sports, such as football, as well as others. Some symptoms of CTE are thought to include difficulties with thinking (cognition), physical problems, emotions and other behaviors.

According to Boston University’s Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy, 76 of the 79 brains of deceased NFL players studied at the Department of Veterans Affairs’ brain repository in Bedford, Massachusetts, have shown some form of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, a degenerative brain disease.

CTE is a very controversial condition that is still not well-understood. Researchers do not yet know the frequency of CTE in the population and do not understand the causes. There is no cure for CTE.

It’s about life and options after playing days are over,” Grants Irons said. “We want people to consider being in a position to have options and not put all your eggs in one basket.

According to Irons, it is never too late to prepare yourself to walk away on your own terms. Having that education provides that opportunity.

Football is good and we all love it but it is not the end all be all,” he said. “I want to stress to youth that when getting skills, it is not all about sports. You must ready yourself for beyond those days and time when sport passes you by.”

 

A MOTHER’S WORDS

PACE founder and mother Karen Johnson was keen in stressing the value of reaching youth with that message at early and impressionable stages in life.

Johnson, mother of Andre Johnson, 7-time NFL Pro Bowler and former Wide Receiver for the Houston Texans and the Indianapolis Colts.

For years. she fought hard to keep her son away from the temptations of the streets and negative influences, but wondered for a long time whether her efforts would bear fruit.

We went through a lot of struggles,” she said “… I saw our son getting in with wrong crowd and I was not going to lose him to the streets.”

She transferred him to a school where he knew no one and no one knew him and while there he played sports and was involved with various programs.

I stress without having it (education) sports means nothing,” she said.

She thought her work was not in vain, because she could not see he was learning everything she was telling him. Then one day…

Through all the telling teaching and thought I was not reaching him, but one day it dawned that he was getting it when I read on of his essays..,” she said.“He put my teaching and lessons on paper.  I said to myself Thank God I am getting through to my child.

It inspired her to later found PACE and work with the On and Off program to make a difference in the lives of youth.

PACE is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization that consists of mothers of professional athletes, celebrities and entertainers both current and retired.

The organization’s goal is to establish and implement programs with a commitment to improve the health, welfare and education of the nation’s children.

 

TAKE AWAY

Both Wyms and Irons agree that they want children to have confidence that they can walk away a winner in today’s society.

I think a lot of messages in our culture tell our young men that they can’t do certain things and that they are not smart enough to compete mentally,” Irons said. “You can be what ever you want if you put the work in.

​Wyms said he is optimistic about being a difference maker for thousands more with the partnership with junior high school, Johnson and Irons family.

Society is telling kids how how to think, feel, talk and act and that is not healthy,” he said. “Success is the same for everyone…Things don’ t just happen or come to you  – you have to work for it”

That’s what America is and that what it will always be. You can carve out your place in this world – just go do it…. And We have to help.”

 

 

Interview By: Chandra Jarmon

Story By: Darwin Campbell

 

 

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Claude Cummings: Statement on Charlottesville http://www.aframnews.com/claude-cummings-statement-on-charlottesville/ http://www.aframnews.com/claude-cummings-statement-on-charlottesville/#respond Mon, 14 Aug 2017 16:05:49 +0000 http://www.aframnews.com/?p=19298 “No one should mistake the cowards who descended upon Charlottesville today as a new expression of white supremacy or antisemitism.  These individuals don’t represent the values held by the vast majority of Americans, but their twisted views and deadly actions are as old as they are ugly.

“What is new and can no longer be ignored is that the racist resentment and divisions pulling our country apart are tolerated and enabled by our President.

“President Trump’s refusal to condemn the racist hate and violent acts of white supremacists is a failure in leadership and basic de

We can’t count on our President to represent or demonstrate the core values that truly make America great – diversity, inclusiveness, sense of community.   

“I ask that you stand with CWA in expressing our deepest condolences to the families who lost loved ones in today’s horrible demonstration of hate.  We honor, the strength and character reflected in the heroic actions of students, local police, state police and the brave men and women who stood up to overt racists.

“And to those who turn to violence driven by hate, and to the failed leaders who enable them, know that we will not stand for it.  We have the courage to demonstrate the core values that our elected leaders do not.”

 

 

 

 

 

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How Giving Back Can Save A Generation: Youth Get Doses of Truth & Prescriptions for Success http://www.aframnews.com/how-giving-back-can-save-a-generation-youth-get-doses-of-truth-prescriptions-for-success/ http://www.aframnews.com/how-giving-back-can-save-a-generation-youth-get-doses-of-truth-prescriptions-for-success/#respond Mon, 14 Aug 2017 15:46:42 +0000 http://www.aframnews.com/?p=19234

“We need to steer clear of this poverty of ambition, where people want to drive fancy cars and wear nice clothes and live in nice apartments but don’t want to work hard to accomplish these things. Everyone should try to realize their full potential.

Barack Obama – 44th President of the United States

 

 

CONROE– One of the most important characteristics of success is knowing how to play the game of life on and off the field.

That was one of the main capsules of truth shared with over 112 children attending a youth training designed to equip their tool boxes with valuable information to help steer them through up and coming challenges to their education, in their neighborhoods and among friends.

The initiative is part of the The Wyms Foundation and dedicated its 2017 camp program to honor the athletic and community excellence and contributions of Gerald Irons Sr.

Iron, a 10 year NFL veteran and a dedicated father and husband who also served as former Conroe ISD School Board President.

The event was held at the Gerald D. Iron Sr. Junior High School in Conroe – which bears his name.

The camp also was for athletes and STEAM and stressed the value and benefits of being postive competitors in life

 

The Foundation

The Wyms Foundation creates programs that focus on Fitness, S.T.E.M. and Personal Intervention through E-Colors in Education.

The effort is the brainchild of Ellis R. Wyms. He proved to be a winner on and off the field and his life story reflects examples of  courage perseverance, hard work and a winning attitude.

Ellis played 8 years in the NFL with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, the Seattle Seahawks and The Minnesota Vikings.

Excellence in academics is something Ellis has always believed in and is the message he brings to youth around the country.  He understands that America’s educational system plays a pivotal role in the future of America.

The programs and events are designed to improve middle school age youth in 3 areas: S.T.E.M, Fitness and Personality Diversity with the goal to provide computer devices and online programming to schools and community centers that have summer enrichment and after school programs. The programming will immerse students into Science, Computer Science, Engineering, Fitness Gaming and Personality Diversity.

Power Youth Messages

– Gerald D. Irons

Irons was the first secondary school in the U.S. to be named after an NFL player.

He played professional football for the Oakland Raiders and the Cleveland Browns from 1970-80, moved to The Woodlands about 30 years ago.

In the decades since he has had a 32-year career with The Woodlands Development Company, served on CISD’s board of trustees for 22 years and written a book, “When Preparation Meets Opportunity,” with his wife, Myrna.

Originally from Gary, Indiana, Irons is the youngest of seven children in his family.

Being Unselfish and Giving Back

Irons has spent his life instilling the value of education in his own children and his message described positive reasons for being involved in making a difference in his community.

All three of his sons went to school in CISD and went on to receive full football scholarships. His oldest son, Gerald Jr., played for the University of Nebraska; his middle son, Jarrett, played for the University of Michigan; and his youngest son, Grant, played for the University of Notre Dame and went on to play professionally for the Oakland Raiders.

They worked hard and got good grades and got full scholarships to the colleges that they wanted to go to,” Irons said.

I always wanted to give back, and I knew how important education is to success in life,” he said.

Irons also said he wanted to be part of CISD’s school board because he wanted to provide the same motivation and inspiration to students that his parents provided for him and his siblings.

Five-Point Success Formula

Irons stressed 5 things that are keys need to practice now to stay on the right track.

His five-point formula for successful includes:

  • Attitude – “Believe in yourself and believe in your dream – say I can do this.”
  • Association – “History says you become the average of five people you spend most of your time with – take time with successful people.”
  • Action – “Action speaks louder that words – Do Something – Be person of action. If you purpose it go and achieve it.”
  • Application – “Learn what to do and what not to do and apply it to proper situations.”
  • Accountability – “Mean what you say and do what you do. Make your word stand and mean something to you.”

He topped off his words to the children calling for each to walk with character and integrity.

– Grant Irons

According to Grant Irons, Wyms and others speaking to youth nationwide involved in the program, the NFL experience helped to mold him  and inspired him to care about his community and understanding the importance of teamwork in the field of education of youth and preparing the next generation.

“Life has its ups and downs,” he said. “Only a winning mindset can overcome. So, think positive and always focus on what is right.”

Grant Irons is a former NFL player and American football defensive end. He played in 43 career games for the University of Notre Dame, making 26 starts at numerous positions on defense. He also played for the Buffalo Bills in 2002 and also played for the Oakland Raiders from 2003 to 2006.

In his post football career, he has built a successful career and business in medical health profession.
Perserverance

One of the most important message to youth involved stressing education and not giving up on building on talents and skills.

According to Irons, it all starts with selecting and surrounding yourself around the good people in your lives, such as father, mother, older brothers. That was giant key for him.

In high school, Irons not only shared the influence and impact of his mm and dad, but also it helped him become the top high school scholar athlete in the nation and led him to Notre Dame.

“The definition of greatness begins with selecting the proper role models and using talents as building blocks.” he told the youth sharing the importance of not allowing obstacles or others to get in the way. “Have a will to win and a desire to overcome. Focus on education and using your talents.”

Irons shared with students about the importance of time management on reaching goals.

Proper time Management

“Everyone of us has 24 hours,” Grant Irons said. “What you do with that 24 hours makes all the difference in the world.”

He urged the young people to pause 5 to 10 minute daily and focus on asking themselves what kind of person they want to be and to think and picture where each wants or where they want to be in 5, 10, or 15 years from now.

 

-Jackie Battle

Battle is a former American football running back.

He was signed as an undrafted free agent by the Dallas Cowboys in 2007. He played college football at the University of Houston.

In addition to the Cowboys, Battle played for the Kansas City Chiefs, San Diego Chargers and Tennessee Titans.

“The NFL helped build my character. I used it to help me work harder to succeed,” he said. “I decided while I was playing for 8 years, I would never be outworked or outplayed –I played 8 years when average is three.”

Battle was born in  Humble, Texas and started his football career as a youth playing football in the Humble Area Football League  HAFL. Battle also attended Humble High School where he tallied 1,524 rushing yards and 20 total TDs. While at Humble he was twice selected 1st team All-District and was ranked by Rivals.com as the 38th best high school running back in America.

Goal Setting

He shared the importance of making sacrifices early to achieve short and long range goals.

Getting a degree is worth more than partying,” he said. “Its a choice and you can choose what and who you allow into your life.”

He also said it is important to choose a set of friends based on whether they help you and encourage you to succeed.

 

Using Failure Positively

According to Battle, failure should serve as a motivator.

Failure is a learning experience. When you fail, it gives you and opportunity to get up,” he said. “Be optimistic with failure and ask yourself what can I learn from it.”

He noted that young people need to learn early the notion that “Bad company corrupts good morals” and that bad people and influences can hurt chances for success.

Most of the young men he knew or grew up with from his area ended up in jail or not graduating from high school, he said.

 

Beating the Odds

You can beat a bad neighborhood and come out of a bad environment,” he said. ‘Take advantage of every opportunity, use your talents, be passionate and work hard to get to next level”.

To summarize he restated that wanting to be successful involves making the sacrifices, choosing the right friends and take care of your body.

Your goal should be to take care of yourself and work hard with a purpose,” Battle added. “Take charge of circumstances and trust in God to lead you.”

Christopher Bedford, 14, described the event and information as very useful.

It was a very interesting and I learned a lot,” he said. “I think that I am going to take some classes and design games.”

Interview By: Chandra Jarmon

Story By: Darwin Campbell

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The Lost Sport In The Black Community http://www.aframnews.com/19227-2/ http://www.aframnews.com/19227-2/#respond Fri, 11 Aug 2017 20:23:54 +0000 http://www.aframnews.com/?p=19227 I love the game of baseball. I played baseball from the age of 4 until I was 17. I stopped playing because I fell out of love with the game. My years of playing in high school we only won three games, but no matter what our record was I played hard and tried to win. I didn’t see that in my teammates, we would lose and they would be laughing like we just won. That made me very upset because I hate to lose, losing made me lose my passion form the game. I still today regret not staying with the game. I started coaching baseball and that put the fire and desire back in me to play the game, but I knew I could never play the game again like I did as a kid.

Baseball is the highest paid sport in the country, but there are only 61 black players in the game. Let’s do the math there are 32 teams with 25 players on the active roster, so that makes 800 players. Out of 800 players there are only 61 American born black players, that’s a problem.

I can remember growing up and most of the best players was black, but today I bet the average person couldn’t name one black person in the league without going to Google. I never thought in today’s time that I would meet a person who had the same amount of passion I had about baseball, until I met Coach Larry Davis. He is the coach of the Lincoln city Rays, who has been coaching baseball for 60 years in Lincoln City Park. He also coached for the boys and girls club of Houston and Doss park just to name a few. He won 6 championships through the years but his passion runs deeper than that. What he really wants to do is to bring baseball back. We talked about how in the 80s and 90s you could find kids playing baseball at any park or any field. You would see them playing without gloves, baseball, or bats, all they had was a broken broom handle and tennis balls and whatever they could find to use as base. That was love for the game! how can we get that back. It starts with getting the passion back, we have to reintroduce the the sport back into the inner city youths.

I was introduced to the game of baseball by my uncle Timothy Smith he taught me the basic things I needed to know about the game. After interviewing Larry Davis I learned that he and my uncle had been working together teaching and coaching baseball together at Lincoln city park for a few years together. By talking to the two of them they want the same thing I want “To bring baseball back to the inner city”.

But in order to do that it takes our community “The Black Community”. We need volunteers to help coach and work with the kids, we need sponsors willing to help out in ways they can. Coach Larry Davis and Timothy Smith has formed a non-profit organization together called, Houston Volunteers for youth development. There is nothing that can be done without volunteers who are committed to helping these kids. As of today, Timothy Smith, Larry Davis and myself are committed to organizing a tournament for the inner city neighborhoods of Fifth Ward, Southpark, Third ward, Acres Homes, Studewood, Sunnyside,Greenspoint, Trinity Garden, Homestead Area and South Union.

If you would like to volunteer to help, or you want to sponsor a team please call Coach Larry Davis at 281-537-0964 or email Timothy Smith at: smith71989@yahoo.com, or me Jermaine Hayter at Mr.Hayter72@gmail.com .

We are very committed to getting the ball rolling on these kids and getting baseball back into the inner city. Once again volunteers are very important to get it going and commitment is greatly needed.

The Sports Corner with Jay the Barber!

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The Past Is Our Present http://www.aframnews.com/the-past-is-our-present/ http://www.aframnews.com/the-past-is-our-present/#respond Fri, 11 Aug 2017 17:36:32 +0000 http://www.aframnews.com/?p=19194
By: Chelsea Davis-Bibb, M.Ed.

Our society at times is so messed up, and sometimes I wonder if we will ever get it right. The current Presidency and White House is a daily reality TV show, there is a lot of hatred going on, our youth seem to be lost or misguided, and people are constantly losing their lives over non-sense. The only thing that keeps me going is faith and hope. I believe those are two important things that everyone needs to have.

Our society, this nation, and the whole world have come a long way, but it seems like our progress has taken several steps backwards. When former President Obama took office, I think a lot of people thought we had finally made it. As many would call it the “post racial” era. However, they were wrong. As soon as he took office, it seemed as if a lot of racism and hatred took office as well. I don’t think racism and hatred ever left, but it slowly started to come out in full effect, and with our new president, its as if some people has looked at this election as a free pass to be a jerk. I just call it people finally showing their true colors. I think America is finally showing her true colors. The main people I worry about is our youth.

Our youth does not know about the struggle many African Americans have faced in the past. They don’t really talk about it much at schools, and if is taught, a textbook can only say so much. In fact, it only says what they want people to know. Black History Month also isn’t celebrated like it should be. Even though we shouldn’t wait until a certain month to recognize the history that has brought us where we are today, it needs to be celebrated to the fullest. I don’t think our youth truly understand how far we’ve come as a race, but more importantly how far we are going backwards. My dad has told me on more than one occasion that we are going to have to start protesting etc. He also said that we are losing some of our youth to the ills of this society. I didn’t want to believe him, but he was right.

In my opinion, our youth are distracted. Social media is a lot of the problem because that is where they spend a lot of their time. If it’s not Facebook, it’s Instagram, and if it’s not that, then its Snapchat. I don’t think they are focused on what is really going on around them. Don’t get me wrong, social media isn’t all bad, but it’s a huge distracter. Social media has also become a platform for them to say whatever they want and post whatever videos thinking it won’t come without any consequences. In addition, police brutality is still in the news. Please don’t take this the wrong way. Do I think that we have some racist cops in the field? Yes! But I also think some issues wouldn’t escalate if people would just comply, and act cordial and try and talk without thinking someone is out to hurt them right away. Some things can simply be avoided. Point blank. As a high school teacher, I have witnessed many things with our youth. A lot of them simply don’t like authority. They don’t respect their parents, teachers, officers, or even themselves. This must change. Our youth really are our future, and right now, I need our youth to look around them and see what is really going on.

Our youth need to wake up, and if they don’t want to wake up, we need to force them to. Each one of us need to step up and assume responsibility in helping turn our youth around by being a true mentor and role model. We also need to educate them more about the past so that they can be informed. I am not saying stir up the past to create more anger or hatred, but they need to understand the past so that they can understand what is happening in the present. If you consider the past and what history tells us, we are reliving it now. How can they know what to do or expect if they don’t know their roots?  Do our youth know about Thurgood Marshall, Frederick Douglass, George Washington Carver, Malcom X, W.E. B. Du Bois, and many other historical figures who have made a huge impact on our culture? Yes, our youth has probably heard of these figures, but do they truly know and understand what they did, the sacrifices they made for the cause of African Americans, and what they truly represented? Our youth are asleep, and it’s time to wake them up!

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DID YOU KNOW? One of The Oldest Black Baptist Churches in Texas http://www.aframnews.com/19229-2/ http://www.aframnews.com/19229-2/#respond Fri, 11 Aug 2017 15:43:00 +0000 http://www.aframnews.com/?p=19229

A Historical Snapshot of  Rev. Israel Campbell and Galveston’s Avenue L Missionary Baptist Church

Israel Sydney Campbell was born in Russellville, Ky.  This gifted child, born into slavery, grew to become a strong Christian young man, dedicated to Christ and his church, and he impacted Baptist life in Texas like no other.

Following his conversion, Israel Sydney Campbell, (1815-1898), became a Baptist as a 21-year-old and answered God’s call to preach the next year, even though he still was a slave.

Despite great trials, hardships and beatings, he was pastor of churches in Tennessee, Canada and Ohio before his ordination in 1855 at age 40.

He then became a missionary in Louisiana and Texas, arriving in the Lone Star State as other missionaries also were arriving to minister here.

Galveston’s Avenue L Missionary Baptist Church

Most of the first Baptists to set foot in Texas came by ship in those days, docking at Galveston Island and trekking inland from the Gulf of Mexico. American Home Missionary James Huckins, William Tryon, George Washington Baines and Robert Emmett Bledsoe Baylor were among these first Baptists to arrive.

In 1840, Huckins helped organize First Baptist Church in Galveston the same year several black Baptists first became a part of that church family. Huckins then aided black Baptists in the growing city to organize their own church, the Colored Baptist Church of Galveston, 20 years before the Civil War.

This congregation met in the courthouse several years; it was a safe place where slaves could gather to worship and learn to read and write.

In 1855, it changed its name to African Baptist Church, but the Civil War began to disrupt services more often than not. After emancipation and the war’s end, when Gail Borden Jr. and other Baptist brothers bought and deeded land to the African Baptist Church, Israel Campbell and a fellow pastor, I. Rhinehart, went to work. In 1867, Campbell reorganized the straggling membership into a new congregation, called First Regular Missionary Baptist Church, and relocated it to 26th Street and Avenue L.

This was the first entirely independent black Baptist church organized in Texas following the 1863 emancipation. It soon grew under Campbell’s leadership to more than 500 members. In 1868, Campbell, along with Baptist pastor friends John Henry “Jack” Yates and Peter Diggs, organized the first association of black Baptists in Texas, called the Lincoln District Baptist Association.
In 1872, they founded the Baptist State Missionary and Education Convention. Financially supported by the American Baptist Home Mission Society of New York, this convention was the first statewide black Baptist organization in Texas. With Campbell as one of its primary leaders, the convention became a success, and, by 1890, the churches of the convention had a membership of more than 110,000. (By 1916, 72 percent of the state’s black churchgoers were Baptists.) In February 1891, at age 76, and after dedicating a new sanctuary built that year, Campbell retired as pastor of First Regular Missionary Baptist Church.
The “Father of Black Baptists in Texas” died in La Marque on June 13, 1898, and was buried in Lakeview Cemetery in Galveston.
When the devastating hurricane of 1900 pounded most of the island’s buildings into the ocean, the congregation lost its church home. However, by 1904, the congregation built a new wooden sanctuary and renamed the church, “Avenue L Missionary Baptist Church.” In 1916, the African-American firm of Tanner Brothers Contractors and Architects constructed a red-brick sanctuary on the site, which still stands today at Avenue L, along with the 1904 structure on its west side.
For nearly 150 years, this church has been a faithful witness for Christ in Galveston, ministering to the community and training disciples, guided by the motto: “See a need. Meet a need.”
Many of its members are multi-generational descendants of the church’s founders, who worship today with people from many ethnic backgrounds.

SOURCE: KAREN O’DELL BULLOCK / B.H. CARROLL THEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE, THE BAPTIST STANDARD, July 27, 2016

By:Darwin Campbell

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The Lost Sport in the Black Community http://www.aframnews.com/the-lost-sport-in-the-black-community/ http://www.aframnews.com/the-lost-sport-in-the-black-community/#respond Thu, 10 Aug 2017 18:00:44 +0000 http://www.aframnews.com/?p=19223 I love the game of baseball. I played baseball from the age of 4 until I was 17. I stopped playing because I fell out of love with the game. My years of playing in high school we only won three games, but no matter what our record was I played hard and tried to win. I didn’t see that in my teammates, we would lose and they would be laughing like we just won. That made me very upset because I hate to lose, losing made me lose my passion form the game. I still today regret not staying with the game. I started coaching baseball and that put the fire and desire back in me to play the game, but I knew I could never play the game again like I did as a kid.

Baseball is the highest paid sport in the country, but there are only 61 black players in the game. Let’s do the math there are 32 teams with 25 players on the active roster, so that makes 800 players. Out of 800 players there are only 61 American born Black players, that’s a problem.

I can remember growing up and most of the best players was black, but today I bet the average person couldn’t name one black person in the league without going to Google. I never thought in today’s time that I would meet a person who had the same amount of passion I had about baseball, until I met Coach Larry Davis. He is the coach of the Lincoln city Rays, who has been coaching baseball for 60 years in Lincoln City Park. He also coached for the boys and girls club of Houston and Doss park just to name a few. He won 6 championships through the years but his passion runs deeper than that. What he really wants to do is to bring baseball back. We talked about how in the 80s and 90s you could find kids playing baseball at any park or any field. You would see them playing without gloves, baseball, or bats, all they had was a broken broom handle and tennis balls and whatever they could find to use as base. That was love for the game! how can we get that back. It starts with getting the passion back, we have to reintroduce the the sport back into the inner city youths.

I was introduced to the game of baseball by my uncle Timothy Smith he taught me the basic things I needed to know about the game. After interviewing Larry Davis I learned that he and my uncle had been working together teaching and coaching baseball together at Lincoln city park for a few years together. By talking to the two of them they want the same thing I want “To bring baseball back to the inner city”.

But in order to do that it takes our community “The Black Community”. We need volunteers to help coach and work with the kids, we need sponsors willing to help out in ways they can. Coach Larry Davis and Timothy Smith has formed a non-profit organization together called, Houston Volunteers for youth development. There is nothing that can be done without volunteers who are committed to helping these kids. As of today, Timothy Smith, Larry Davis and myself are committed to organizing a tournament for the inner city neighborhoods of Fifth ward, Southpark, Third ward, Acres Homes, Studewood, Sunnyside,Greenspoint, Trinity garden, Homestead area and South union.

If you would like to volunteer to help, or you want to sponsor a team please call Coach Larry Davis at 281-537-0964 or email Timothy Smith at: smith71989@yahoo.com, or me Jermaine Hayter at Mr.Hayter72@gmail.com.

We are very committed to getting the ball rolling on these kids and getting baseball back into the inner city. Once again volunteers are very important to get it going and commitment is greatly needed.

The sports corner with Jay the Barber!

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From 5th to 1st http://www.aframnews.com/from-5th-to-1st/ http://www.aframnews.com/from-5th-to-1st/#respond Thu, 10 Aug 2017 17:50:50 +0000 http://www.aframnews.com/?p=19219 It has been said that Fifth Ward is one of the roughest places to grow up in Houston TX.  Its a well-known area for crime, gangs, drugs, and prostitution. I know from first-hand experience since that’s where I grew up. It’s not easy not to become another statistic in the mean rough and tough streets of Fifth Ward. But we’re not talking about me, I want to talk about William Jackson lll.

William Jackson lll was born on October 27,1992 to parents Vanessa Hailey and William Jackson Jr.  In Houston, TX (Fifth Ward) he has four siblings three sisters and one brother. He has overcome being a statistic by having a strong support system from his mom, and what is considered a rare commodity in fifth ward his “Father” a lot of children wasn’t as lucky to have both parents in the household.  His father William Jr. was a fixture in his life, he stayed on him about working hard and being the best man and person you could be. He would go to work with his dad, who owned his own ac /heating company called Terrell AC/Heating Company. He always kept him busy and away from the streets, he had a phrase that he always used “sometimes you have to do things you don’t want to get to where you wanna be”. He got to the NFL by working hard and being consistent, it’s not easy coming from Fifth Ward to being the first round draft pick for the Cincinnati Bengals.

William Jackson lll was a standout football player at Wheatley High School in Houston’s Fifth Ward. He played corner back alongside Xavier Howard safety for (Miami Dolphins). They were the best one and two punch in the city as safety and corner back. William Jackson lll also goes by “William Bucktown Jackson” or “Lil Will”.

Lil Will did not get recruited by a major university so he went to Trinity Valley Jr. College. Where he did one year and was recruited by Tom Herman and the University of Houston Cougars. While at University of Houston he was still a stand out player but he was labeled as being too small, he over came that and became one of the best corner back in all of college football. He was considered a lock down cornerback.

On September 30,2013 he was named AAC (American Athlete Conference) player of the week, 2014 he was named to the AAC all conference second team, and in 2015 he was named on Phil Steel’s preseason all-American third team and his biggest collegiate accomplishment was when he was named MVP over the dominate power house Florida State he had 2 interceptions and 10 tackles one for a 6 yard lost and one of the best games of his  career. He ended his career at U of H with 40 pass break ups which put him third on the all-time list, despite only playing three years he ended his collegian career with a game clinching interception against Florida state.

He went on to be drafted in the first round of the NFL draft to the

with the 24th pick in the 2016 draft. Unfortunately he was injured in off season work out and was out for the whole 2016 season. He worked hard to get back in shape for the 2017 season in which he is projected to be a starter for the season opener.  He came home to do his first football camp and he did it for free. The camp took place at Wheatley High School in fifth ward, he also had a host of other NFL players to come out and help including another Houston native Brandon Lafell wide receiver for the Cincinnati Bengals. The kids really enjoyed themselves, but to look at some of the professional players faces, they look as if they had more fun then the kids. I watched them bring the best out of the kids. They hit every drill in confidence, also I heard that kids tried to compete against the NFL player .

After the camp I interviewed William Jackson lll and his dad William Jackson Jr.

Interview:  J.H. William Jackson lll, how was it growing up In Fifth ward, what was the first sport you played, and how did you stay out of trouble?

W.J. It was rough, the first sport I played was football I went to football camps and I rode horses that kept me away from the streets.

J.H. How was it having both parents in your life?

W.J. My parents pushed me very hard they always wanted what was best for me

J.H. What was one thing your dad told you that made you want to work so hard?

W.J. Sometimes you got to do something you don’t want do to get where you wanna be

J.H. I see that stuck with you, I follow you on social media and I see how hard you been working to get back to play.

W.J. Yea I have always been a hard worker I’m just trying to get it in I want to be the best.

J.H. So did you have a chip on your shoulder when you went to U of H?

W.J. O yea I had a big chip I had to prove everybody wrong, that made me work harder. I would say the Fiesta Bowl against Florida State everybody counted us out. I won the game I had two interceptions and 10 tackles and I also won MVP.

J.H.What was it like getting drafted?

It was a blessing all my hard work paid off

J.H.You were drafted in the first round of the NFL draft with 24 picks did you expect that?

Yes they had projected me somewhere around that number

J.H.What was it like when you got hurt?

It was very humbling everything I worked hard for could have been gone, but that just made me work harder

J.H.What made you want to do a camp and do it for free?

Man I’m blessed I just wanted to give back to what I didn’t have, a lot of people can’t afford to go to a camp. I’m blessed to be in a position to make a lot of money it’s the least I can do.

J.H.Will you be back next year?

Yes I will be back next year even bigger

J.H.Good luck ,on the coming season

Thanks,

Interview: William Jackson Jr.

J.H.What was it like trying to keep Will out of trouble growing up in 5th ward?

W.J.Jr. He played football and rode horses, I took him to work, and kept him busy with football camps

J.H.Did he have any friends that fell victim to the streets

W.J.Jr He had a few but I  did my best to keep him out of that crowd

J.H.What was it like for you going through the draft process?

W.J.Jr. It was amazing unbelievable good time for him great time for all of his hard work was worth it

J.H.Did you play sports?

W.J.Jr. Yes I played basketball but I didn’t play for the school because it was just me and my mom, I had to work

J.H.Did you attend any colleges?

W.J.Jr. Yes I attended Universal Technical Institute I took up ac and heating

J.H.What kind of work do you do you do now?

W.J.JrI have my own business Terrell ac and heating, I been doing that for about 15 yrs

J.H.How was it raising him through college keeping him out of the party life?

W.J.Jr. He was focused all he did was work, it sounds hard but he did. I always told him to be on time and always be persistent and he is still that way today I was big on that. I also told him if you can  make time to party and your job not done that’s not gonna work you get to doing that to much you will get use to doing it.

J.H.If a kid came to camp and asked you what can you tell him to get where Will is what would you tell him?

W.J.Jr. Work hard, like I always told him and now its installed in him. Sometimes you got to do what you don’t want to get to where you wanna be if you work hard the sky is the limit.

J.H.I can tell that he is a very humble young man you raised him right not to many people come back and do what he did free football camp. How did you feel when he told you he wanted to dome free camp?

W.J.Jr. I was always big on giving back now through him it’s a reflection of me. I feel like some of these kids would never get the opportunity to attend a football camp, they don’t have a dad or somebody to look up too. You give them that opportunity that just might change there lives.

J.H.Did you see him being where he is now?

W.J.Jr Yes he can do whatever he wanted as long as he stayed focused

J.H.What is your other son name and does he play sports?

W.J.Jr. Devonte Jackson,No he works with me in the family business

J.H.What kind of influence did his mom have on him?

W.J.Jr She was there we have a good relationship we have a kid together we always talk about whatever involved him , but when we had to put our foot down we did and the outcome was positive

Food for thought:

You don’t often see a strong bond between a father and his son in the inner city but this is one for the ages, a father that’s proud of both of his son’s and son’s that are proud of there father

The Sports Corner with Jay the Barber

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C.O.H Report Card http://www.aframnews.com/c-o-h-report-card/ http://www.aframnews.com/c-o-h-report-card/#respond Thu, 10 Aug 2017 17:32:51 +0000 http://www.aframnews.com/?p=19216  

Report cards are rare in the summer, but I am glad to report on the progress we are making on several initiatives designed to enhance the quality of life in Houston neighborhoods.

Every neighborhood deserves to have a thriving population of young people who find opportunity and meaningful activities. I am glad to report that 5,200 youth found work this year through the Mayor’s Hire Houston Summer Jobs program that connected them to private businesses and non-profit organizations.

Meanwhile my Complete Communities program is moving forward in its initial stage. This program, which I announced in the spring, will bring together public resources, private businesses and philanthropic groups to improve overall conditions in five “pilot” neighborhoods: Third Ward, Second Ward, Near Northside, Acres Home and Gulfton. By “pilot,” I mean that these neighborhoods will serve as test cases for a program I want to implement citywide.

Planners have already met with neighborhood leaders to set priorities for the improvements. Next, we will launch a series of public meetings where my staff and I gather more feedback from residents in each neighborhood. We will not impose one-size-fits-all solutions in these neighborhoods. We will only move forward after listening closely to each area’s wants and needs.

But we also plan to move quickly after we gather the wide-ranging feedback. First will come “quick delivery” items, such as enhanced street lighting and new playground equipment, even as we plan long-term housing and economic revitalization projects.

Learn more online at
http://www.houstontx.gov/completecommunities/

On another front, we are moving forward with hiring a company to provide new curbside recycling service, including the resumption of the recycling of glass. As the value and methods of recycling change, we will select a service that will keep up with technology and provide the best financial deal for the city.

Also, the City Council just a few days ago approved my proposal to add $4 million to a program to repair roofs and make other structural repairs on homes that were covered by those blue tarps resulting from hurricane damage several years ago. As we look to improve every neighborhood in our great city, it’s time to make permanent fixes.

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